Victim impact testimony and the psychology of punishment
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Victim impact testimony and the psychology of punishment

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Published by American Bar Foundation in Chicago, Ill .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Victims of crimes -- United States,
  • Sentences (Criminal procedure) -- United States,
  • Jurors -- United States -- Decision-making

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references.

StatementJanice Nadler, Mary Rose.
SeriesABF working paper -- #2104.
ContributionsRose, Mary R. 1966-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsKF9685 .N32 2001
The Physical Object
Pagination24 p. ;
Number of Pages24
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16337115M
OCLC/WorldCa51843993

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At the penalty phase of capital trials, emotionally charged testimony can be presented about the loss of the victim (Victim Impact Statement; VIS) or the potential loss of the defendant (Execution. By Janice Nadler and Mary R. Rose, Published on 01/01/03Cited by: Victim impact testimony and the psychology of punishment. Cornell Law Review, 88 (2), Nadler, Janice ; Rose, Mary R. / Victim impact testimony and the psychology of by: dental harm in the psychology of punishment and victim impact state-ments as a species of such accidental harm. In Part III, we present empirical evidence that suggests that victim impact statements do in fact influence lay sentencing decisions. After discussing the results ofCited by:

Victim Impact Testimony and the Psychology of Punishment () In this article, the authors report their empirical findings from a new experiment suggesting that adventitious, emotional harm affects jurors' sentencing decisions. Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): l (external link) http Author: Janice Nadler and Mary R. Rose. Additional research might explore the effects of giving victim impact testimony on the victim-witnesses themselves (see Davis & Smith, ). As courts and legislatures consider whether and how to admit victim impact testimony, additional research on these and other questions will undoubtedly be valuable. The emotional and cognitive processes involved in jurors' use of victim impact evidence potentially reveals key insights about the psychological mechanisms underlying laypersons' punishment.

Editor’s Note: This article contains graphic content about child pornography and child sexual abuse. “I am a 19 year old girl and I am a victim of child sex abuse and child pornography.” So begins the powerful “Statement by Amy,” read in a packed court of law in front of the child’s uncle, a man she was trying to prevent being released from prison. “I am still discovering all the. The authors review the literature relevant to the study of violence and safety in women’s prison. Victim Impact Testimony and the Psychology of Punishment () In this article, the authors report their empirical findings from a new experiment suggesting that adventitious, emotional harm affects jurors' sentencing decisions. In most states, victim impact statements cannot characterize the defendant in negative terms, nor can victim impact statements describe the type of punishment the victim or victim’s survivors feel is appropriate for the defendant. The presence of victim impact statements in the sentencing phase of trials is an extraordinarily controversial issue. which addresses victim impact statements, is typical in its language and scope: a summary of the economic loss or damage suffered by the victim as a result of the (a) A victim has the right to submit an impact statement to the court at the time of sentencing or.